Print

Check your answers here!


Appalachian Quiz

1. A.
Afeared is another way to say the word afraid! Though this word was once very common it is now mainly found in southern dialects. It is documented in Appalachia in 1927 and is stil common amongst the older generations.

2. C.
Bealed means festered or infected. This is mainly an Appalachian term and has been documented as a type of medical term from the late 1800’s to present day.

3. C.
Drug is another way of saying the past tense of the word drag. Other ways of saying this are drug, drugged, and dragged. This has been documented in Appalachia since 1913.

4. D.
A fix’n in Appalachia is a piece of equipment or accessory. Other ways of saying this are fixen, or fixing. This was documented in 1919.

5. C
A knot is a lump, tumor or tightened muscle. This was documented in Appalachia in the 1990’s, but is used throughout the mid United States.

6. A.
Mountain oysters are another name for pig testicles. This edible delicacy was recorded in Appalachia in 1944.

7. D.
Poke can mean a small bag or sack in Appalachia. This was documented in 1944 and is still used with the older generations in Appalachia today.

8. C.
Pone is a swelling or a lump. This was documented in Appalachia in 1-13 and it is a swelling that seems to come from deep under your skin.

9. B.
Reckon is another way of saying “I guess”, “I think”, and “I suppose”. It was documented in the Appalachian region in the 1980’s and can still be heard today.

10. C.
Surprisingly Red in the Comb actually means that someone is ready to get married. This comes from the physical reddening of a roosters comb when it is on the prowl for a mate.

11. A.
Sheepie is actually a term that is usually repeated while calling for a sheep. “Here Sheepie, Sheepie, Sheepie!” This was documented in the Appalachian region from the 1940’s to today.

12. D.
A whistle pig is another name for a ground hog (woodchuck, marmot). It comes from the whistling sound that they make and because they grow really fat before hibernation.

West Virginia Quiz

1. A.
Cackleberry is another word for a hen’s egg! This phrase was used in WV in the 1930’s and is still used today. Example: Cook me up a couple of cackleberries for breakfast!

2. C.
Cat’s Head is another name for a large biscuit! This word was used in the 1930’s and is still used today. Example: The large and flaky cats’ heads were the best park of my mom’s home cooking.

3. B.
Hippoes are imaginary or pretend aliments. This is a shortening of the word hypochondria. This was documented in the mid 1900’s and is still used with older generations today.

4. B.
Pert means to be quickly, lively, or in an agreeable way. This can be used as an adjective describing a person or an adverb for how someone is moving. This was used in WV throughout the 20th century.

5. A.
A pie supper is an event where pies are brought in and auctioned off to raise money! This was documented in 1965 in WV.

6. B.
Plague is used as a mild oath or exclamation in WV. It was documented in WV around 1965 and is used in place of cursing.

7. C.
Poke can mean a small bag or sack in WV. This was documented in 1944 and is still used with older generations today.

8. C.
Pone is a swelling or lump (usually on a finger). This was documented in WV in 1968 and is a region specific medical term.

9. C.
Skiff means a light covering of snow. This was documented in WV in the 1930’s.

10. D.
In the Appalachian Dialect the letter “r” is inserted in many words such as warsh= wash, hursh= hush, and mursh= mush. This has been noted since the early 1900’s.


cwe
colson-tenants
clcpodcast